The internet is overflowing with content. People generate written word faster than at any time in history, thousands upon thousands of articles being published every single day, much of which will never make much money or garner much attention. So does content really count? It can if you separate yourself from the masses.

You can start by breaking out of these overused myths, should you dare…

The Mighty Pen

Source: flickr.com/photos/vijayvenkatesh

The More the Merrier

Yes, there is a surplus of content. Yes, more floods the internet on a daily basis. But understanding how to stand out is as simple as realizing the perspective that births most online writing.

Most people people truly believe that more is better. And even as Google updates have forced them to clean up their act, we aren’t seeing many break out of that cage enough to move from acceptable content to amazing content.

Talented writers with valuable information to offer are still very much in high demand.

You Have to Post Daily

Hand-in-hand with website owners who are convinced that a ton of content is the ticket to freedom are the ones who insist every blog should be publishing daily. That Google rewards a constant supply stream.

But if you try to produce too often, the quality suffers. You run out of things to say and lose your passion for saying it.

Once a week is fine if you’re really taking your site to the next level (see the next tip) – many marketers see good results with even less. Make every single blog post count and you don’t need to slap people in the face with it every single day.

A Good Article Can be Written in an Hour

Want a real mind warp? How about spending your entire working day or more on creating one single article? I’m talking about five hours for one article and possibly many more.

This is the type of time and energy it takes to produce a true authority piece. Article writers who churn out five pieces a day are a dime a dozen. Many claim they can do three to five an hour! That type of rehashed junk isn’t fooling anyone, and it does not get shared. Period.

Thought leaders take their work seriously. Work on it all day until it takes on a life of its own. And once it’s done, get to editing – redraft, redraft, and redraft some more. Pretend you’re writing for a magazine.

It feels like wasted time, but putting more effort out not only polishes that piece but helps you hone your writing craft. The more you care about the written word the more success you’ll see.

Don’t Give Too Much Away

Blogging experts urge you to keep your posts short, about 300 words is the standard now. It’s another trick for seeding the Internet with more stuff and geting people back for more.

These aren’t the types of works that get noticed or shared. Instead, try for 1000 to 3000 words – a dynamic piece of content that has extensive images and videos (though only when needed) and really digs into a topic or an angle. It’s called giving it your all and it’s what it takes to produce something meaningful.

How do you make your content stand out?