So, many people have trouble writing copy. It seems to take forever for them to do it, and honestly, the idea that if you mess up, you’ll lose tons of sales (or your clients will lose tons of sales) is very scary. So what often happens because of this? They procrastinate, they never sit down to write the copy, and, at the end of the day, what was originally a small, miniscule project, of only 1,000 words, has turned into some mig, mental nightmare. They’ve turned the proverbial molehill into a mountain. This is a major challenge for many Copywriters and would-be Internet Marketers, when they’re just starting out. So, what do we do about it? How do we get the words down, and stop procrastinating, while still making sure that the final result is something that we can be proud of?

Tip #1: Remember, It’s Just a Draft

Many moons ago, I was in sales, and that helped me a lot throughout my Copywriting career, in fact, many people have often said, if you’re going to get into Copywriting, it’s great for you to start out in sales. But, there were a couple things that were hindrances for me as a Copywriter, coming from a sales-oriented background. What were they? Well, when you’re in sales, if you mess up (which can happen quite often) you can often blow the deal, right there on the spot. You might be trying to close a $300 deal, a $300k deal, and you’ll feel the pressure accordingly, but regardless, one false step, and that prospect is out the door (or off the phone), and that’s all there is to it.

You have to keep in mind however, that Copywriting is NOT the same as sales (especially in this regard). If you mess up in Copywriting, all you’ve done is messed up in Word, or whatever text editor you’re using, and no one (other than you) even saw it, so don’t even worry about it. The key is to just get the words out first… just get them out on paper. If you make a mistake, don’t worry about it, because you can always go back and fix it afterwards. That’s one nice thing that people who’re coming from a sales background really enjoy about Copywriting… the pressure is off.

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Tip #2: Create The Skeleton First…

Instead of trying to figure out the final draft right off the bat, just write the “skeleton” so to speak, of your Copy first. What do I mean by this? Just jot down the most important elements… the things that your prospective buyers absolutely need to know. Don’t try to make it perfect, don’t try to make it emotional, don’t even try to make it creative, not in the first draft. In this first draft, you just want to get the “bare bones” structure of your copy down onto the paper. This will take the pressure off of you, and allow the words to just flow out, instead of them getting caught in your throat. After that…

Tip #3: Edit It, And Imbue It With Power Next…

Once you have the core structure of your copy down on paper, it’s time for editing. One thing every Copywriter will tell you, is that with Copywriting, there is a LOT of editing involved. The final version typically looks very different than the first draft (though you can see all the elements from the first draft if you look closely. When you go back to edit, this is where you want to crank up the emotion, and start getting your project to FEEL what you want them to feel, as opposed to just accepting your points logically. This is also where you finish the ultimate structure of your Copy… such elements as the headline, sub-heads, bullet points, testimonials, etc. This is where you finalize your copy, and make it sing.

Tip #4: It Doesn’t Need To Be Perfect…

Remember, even the final draft isn’t going to be absolutely PERFECT. No matter how much time you spend editing it, it can always be better, but, if you sit there after the final draft is completed, and you just continue writing word after word, you’ll never end up testing the copy, and that’s really where the actual work begins, and it’s where you get the REAL results. You have no way of actually knowing for sure what’s going to work until you’ve actually looked at your conversion rate, period. So take what you have, and see how it actually works before you decide that your final draft isn’t good, and needs more revisions. Sometimes, you might be surprised at how well you do on your first test run, even without spending two years editing and revising your final draft.